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dc.contributor.authorPullin, Naomi
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-05T12:49:12Z
dc.date.available2018-09-05T12:49:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-10
dc.identifier.issn0268-117X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/279587
dc.description.abstractFor centuries, Englishmen and women believed that any misfortune, from the smallest malady to a natural catastrophe, signified divine “justice.” Scholarship on providence and miracles has shown that beliefs in divine intervention were enhanced by the political and religious conflicts of the mid-seventeenth century. This article seeks to refine our understanding of the role of providence in confessional identity formation through an examination of Quaker providential interpretation between 1650 and c.1700. It explores the ways in which Quakers appropriated accounts of divine judgement, circulated them within their community and memorialised them for the benefit of future generations. The discovery of an attempt to create a nationwide record of judgements to befall Quaker persecutors shows that providential stories had a significant role in uniting, and ensuring the survival of a disparate and heavily persecuted religious community.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherInforma UK Limited
dc.titleProvidence, punishment and identity formation in the late-Stuart Quaker community, c.1650–1700
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier4
prism.publicationNameThe Seventeenth Century
prism.volume31
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.26959
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-10-05
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/0268117x.2016.1246261
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-10-05
dc.contributor.orcidPullin, Naomi [0000-0002-1554-4356]
dc.identifier.eissn2050-4616
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2016-11-14
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2017-11-14


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