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dc.contributor.authorDillon, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-11T00:30:28Z
dc.date.available2018-12-11T00:30:28Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-12
dc.identifier.issn2045-5224
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/286604
dc.description.abstractIn this essay I explore the profound and specific fastening of horror to the Anthropocene by considering both scientific and philosophical responses to our contemporary moment. I then take Cormac McCarthy’s The Road as a case study of the Anthropocene horror story, analysed in relation to the four stages of horror as defined by John Clute. This close reading of the The Road reveals a problem with the horror of the Anthropocene: just like the road down which the man and boy travel, it takes us nowhere. I end with a critical engagement with Donna Haraway’s coinage of an alternative descriptor – the Chthulucene – arguing that it remains haunted by horror. I conclude that the challenge remains to think the affect of the horror of the Anthropocene whilst conceiving of stories that will move us beyond it.
dc.publisherOpen Library of Humanities
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleThe Horror of the Anthropocene
dc.typeArticle
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.number2
prism.publicationNameC21 Literature: Journal of 21st-Century Writing
prism.volume6
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.33916
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-07-13
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.16995/c21.38
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-07-13
dc.contributor.orcidDillon, Sarah [0000-0002-6321-1273]
dc.identifier.eissn2045-5224
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2018-02-12


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International