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dc.contributor.authorMcHugh, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-30T13:54:22Z
dc.date.available2019-07-30T13:54:22Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-01
dc.identifier.issn0068-1849
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/295077
dc.description.abstractThis brief comment is about time and its involvement with the Canadian jurisprudence of Aboriginal title. It starts from a simple proposition so basic it can be overlooked or factored out of thought processes even as that activity is displaying this essential everyday quality: A human community lives in time. All things human are subject to change, including the way in which we conceive objects, rules, relationships, traditions, and past events. Historicity-our communication of our sense of living in time and the acknowledgement of the inherent mutability of our world-is part of the human condition. Human life is infused with temporality. All the things that human beings create, materially or intellectually, even those carved like Ozymandias out of marble in seeming defiance of the passage of time, can only be artifacts of their time.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe UBC Law Review Society
dc.title“Aboriginal Title: Travelling from (or to?) an Antique Land?”
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage820
prism.issueIdentifier3
prism.number793
prism.publicationDate2015
prism.publicationNameUniversity of British Columbia Law Review
prism.startingPage793
prism.volume48
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.42155
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-01-28
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-10-01
dc.contributor.orcidMcHugh, Paul [0000-0002-5818-6288]
dc.publisher.urlhttp://ubclawreview.ca/issues/vol-48-no-3-october-2015/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
dc.identifier.urlhttp://ubclawreview.ca/issues/vol-48-no-3-october-2015/


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