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dc.contributor.authorSulovsky, Vedran
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-04T12:15:44Z
dc.date.available2019-12-04T12:15:44Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-21
dc.date.submitted2019-05-17
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/299519
dc.description.abstractIn my thesis I discuss a very influential and widely accepted thesis on the resacralisation of the Holy Roman Empire by Emperor Frederick Barbarossa (1152 – 1190) and Rainald of Dassel (chancellor 1156 – 1159, archbishop of Cologne 1159 – 1167). I first trace the history of this opinion, showing how scholars gradually came to consider sacrum imperium, the phrase from which the title Holy Roman Empire evolved, as the motto of Frederick and Rainald’s imperial ideology. In the postwar period the translation of the bodies of the Three Kings from Milan to Cologne in 1164 by Rainald of Dassel, the canonisation of Charlemagne in 1165, the design of the Cappenberg head, the Barbarossa chandelier and the reliquary shrine of Saint Charlemagne were reinterpreted as elements of Frederick’s plan to resacralise the state. In my thesis I show that there was no such plan. The state had always been both holy and Roman to an extent, but the terminology changed in the twelfth century because of the influence of classical antiquity via Byzantium and Italy. Meanwhile, Frederick’s part in the canonisation of Charlemagne and the visual elaboration of his cult shows how the German magnates and the canons of Aachen similarly reached back to their own founder figure, Charlemagne, to celebrate their unity and legitimise their inherited authority. However, while Frederick commissioned the Barbarossaleuchter to celebrate his grand Easter diet of 1174, the Karlsschrein was a project of Aachen’s Marienstift and the burghers.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis PhD was generously funded Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC UK) and Sidney Sussex College's Osborn Research Studentship. I would like to thank both for their support.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectFrederick Barbarossa
dc.subjectAachen
dc.subjectCharlemagne
dc.subjectSaint Charlemagne
dc.subjectSacrum imperium
dc.subjectImperial chancery
dc.subjectDiplomatic
dc.subjectBarbarossaleuchter
dc.subjectKarlsschrein
dc.subjectTwelfth century Renaissance
dc.subjectRomanitas
dc.subjectRomanising phraseology
dc.subjectRoman law
dc.subjectLotharingia
dc.subjectRomanesque art
dc.subjectSigillography
dc.subjectCanonisation
dc.subjectInvestiture Controversy
dc.subjectPope Alexander III
dc.subjectRainald of Dassel
dc.subjectBiblical Magi
dc.subjectCologne Cathedral
dc.subjectCappenberg head
dc.subjectOtto of Cappenberg
dc.subjectWibald of Stavelot
dc.subjectPeter the Deacon
dc.subjectByzantine influence on Latin Europe
dc.subjectLatin state terminology
dc.subjectHoly kingship
dc.subjectOtto of Freising
dc.subjectItalian communes
dc.subjectAlexandrine schism
dc.titleThe Sanctity of the State under Frederick Barbarossa (1152 - 1190): Saint Charlemagne and the sacrum imperium
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cambridge
dc.publisher.departmentFaculty of History
dc.date.updated2019-12-04T11:31:33Z
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.46592
dc.contributor.orcidSulovsky, Vedran [0000-0001-9951-7410]
dc.publisher.collegeSidney Sussex College
dc.type.qualificationtitleDoctor in History
cam.supervisorBerend, Nora
cam.thesis.fundingtrue
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2026-02-11


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