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Edited by Noa Lavi & David E. Friesem

The practice of sharing food among hunting and gathering societies has attracted significant scholarly attention from anthropological, evolutionary and archaeological perspectives. This edited monograph offers to broaden the view of the practice of sharing to include sharing of space, actions, land, knowledge, time, self and identity. The chapters in this book present ethnographic, archaeological and theoretical cases from different periods of time, diverse communities and environments across the world to demonstrate how perceptions, values and mechanics previously assigned to food sharing, are applied to other tangible and intangible forms of sharing. The cross-disciplinary integration between archaeologists and biological and social anthropologists expands the understanding of what is socially required for sharing, how it is practiced and experienced, what it allows and what are its social and evolutionary implications. The new concepts and understandings of sharing that emerge from this book provide a multi-layered framework which can be applied in various contexts aiding in unravelling new intangible aspects of this core social practice. This monograph raises an insightful and timely discussion about the evolution and social complexity of non-agrarian societies in general and provides new tools and ideas to explore the complexity and diversity in the social world of past and contemporary societies.

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