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dc.contributor.authorRees, Susan J
dc.contributor.authorWells, Ruth
dc.contributor.authorMohsin, Mohammed
dc.contributor.authorNadar, Nawal
dc.contributor.authorMoussa, Batool
dc.contributor.authorHassoun, Fatima
dc.contributor.authorYousif, Mariam
dc.contributor.authorKhalil, Batoul
dc.contributor.authorKrishna, Yalini
dc.contributor.authorNancarrow, Heather
dc.contributor.authorSilove, Derrick
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Jane
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-21T23:05:30Z
dc.date.available2021-10-21T23:05:30Z
dc.date.issued2021-10-20
dc.identifier.issn2673-4184
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/329724
dc.description.abstract<jats:p>Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major public health issue, including during pregnancy where it poses a serious risk to the woman’s health. Influenza-Like Illness (ILI) also causes significant morbidity for women during pregnancy. It may be possible that ILI in pregnancy is associated with IPV, and that depression and trauma history play a role in the connection. 524 Australia-born women and 578 refugee-background women participated in the study. Baseline participants were randomly recruited and interviewed from antenatal clinics between January 2015 and March 2016, and they were reinterviewed six months post-partum. Bivariate and path analysis were used to assess links between IPV, depression and ILI. One in 10 women (10%; 111 out of 1102) reported ILI during their pregnancy period and this rate was significantly (p &lt; 0.001) higher for women born in conflict-affected countries (13%; 76 out of 578) as compared to Australian-born women (7%; 35 out of 524). In both groups, Time 1 traumatic events, IPV and depression symptoms were significantly associated with ILI at Time 2. A significant association between IPV at Time 1 and ILI at Time 2 was fully mediated by depression symptoms at Time 1 (Beta = 0.36 p &lt; 0.001). A significant direct path was shown from depression symptoms to ILI (Beta = 0.26, p &lt; 0.001). Regardless of migration history, pregnant women who have experienced IPV and depression are more likely to report influenza-like symptoms in pregnancy. This may suggest that trauma and depression negatively affect immunity, although it could also indicate a connection between depressive symptoms and physical experiences of ILI.</jats:p>
dc.languageen
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.subjectintimate partner violence
dc.subjectinfluenza-like illness
dc.subjectdepression
dc.subjecttrauma
dc.subjectpregnancy
dc.titleThe Association between Intimate Partner Violence, Depression and Influenza-like Illness Experienced by Pregnant Women in Australia
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-10-21T23:05:30Z
prism.endingPage203
prism.issueIdentifier4
prism.publicationNameWomen
prism.startingPage192
prism.volume1
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.77171
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-10-15
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3390/women1040017
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidMohsin, Mohammed [0000-0003-2483-3798]
dc.contributor.orcidFisher, Jane [0000-0002-1959-6807]
dc.identifier.eissn2673-4184
pubs.funder-project-idNational Health and Medical Research Council (APP 1164736, RG 180528)
cam.issuedOnline2021-10-20


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