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dc.contributor.authorCarrick, Frederick Robert
dc.contributor.authorValerio, Luis Sebastian Alexis
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez-Vega, Maxine N
dc.contributor.authorEngel, David
dc.contributor.authorSugaya, Kiminobu
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-30T01:13:50Z
dc.date.available2021-10-30T01:13:50Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-26
dc.identifier.citationLife (Basel, Switzerland), volume 11, issue 9
dc.identifier.issn2075-1729
dc.identifier.otherPMC8469926
dc.identifier.other34575027
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/330100
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Wounds are associated with ranges of simple to complex disruption or damage to anatomical structure and function. They are also associated with enormous economic and social costs, increasing yearly, resulting in a severe impact on the wellbeing of individuals and society. Technology that might accelerate wound healing is associated with many benefits to injured people. METHODS: BALBc mice underwent symmetrical excisional wounds through the panniculus carnosus. They were divided into a treatment group placed on an autonomous ceramic far-field infrared blanket (cIFRB) and a control group maintained under standard conditions. We also expanded and cultured adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on cIFRB and compared them to standard conditions subjected to a scratch injury to compare survival, proliferation, and wound healing. RESULTS: The wound healing of the cIRFB treatment group was significantly faster than the control group of mice. The wound-healing effect of mesenchymal stem cells on cIRFB was also increased and associated with significant migration to the wound area. CONCLUSIONS: Wound healing is improved in a mouse model exposed to cFIRB. The ceramic blanket also promotes survival, proliferation, increased migration, and wound healing of MSCs without affecting their survival and proliferation. The utilization of cFIRB in cellular biology and medical applications may be promising in many situations currently explored in animal and human models. This technology needs no direct or battery power source and is entirely autonomous and noninvasive, making its application possible in any environment.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceessn: 2075-1729
dc.sourcenlmid: 101580444
dc.subjectRegeneration
dc.subjectWound healing
dc.subjectCeramic
dc.subjectMesenchymal Stem Cells
dc.subjectMouse Model
dc.subjectFar Field Infrared
dc.titleAccelerated Wound Healing Using a Novel Far-Infrared Ceramic Blanket.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-10-30T01:13:49Z
prism.publicationNameLife (Basel)
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.77544
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-08-25
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3390/life11090878
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidCarrick, Frederick Robert [0000-0002-2818-6551]
dc.contributor.orcidValerio, Luis Sebastian Alexis [0000-0001-8972-1223]
dc.contributor.orcidGonzalez-Vega, Maxine N [0000-0003-0410-1565]
dc.contributor.orcidSugaya, Kiminobu [0000-0002-2788-5457]
dc.identifier.eissn2075-1729
cam.issuedOnline2021-08-26


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International