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dc.contributor.authorKuhn, McKenzie A
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Lauren M
dc.contributor.authorWinder, Johanna C
dc.contributor.authorBraga, Lucas PP
dc.contributor.authorTanentzap, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorBastviken, David
dc.contributor.authorOlefeldt, David
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-12T18:57:06Z
dc.date.available2021-11-12T18:57:06Z
dc.date.issued2021-12
dc.date.submitted2021-06-25
dc.identifier.issn2576-604X
dc.identifier.otheraga220125
dc.identifier.other2021av000515
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/330614
dc.descriptionFunder: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
dc.descriptionFunder: Northern Scientific Training Program, University of Alberta
dc.descriptionFunder: UAlberta North, Vanier Canada Graduate ScholarshipW. Garfield Weston Foundation
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Small, organic‐rich lakes are important sources of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere, yet the sensitivity of emissions to climate warming is poorly constrained and potentially influenced by permafrost thaw. Here, we monitored emissions from 20 peatland lakes across a 1,600 km permafrost transect in boreal western Canada. Contrary to expectations, we observed a shift from source to sink of CO2 for lakes warmer regions, driven by greater primary productivity associated with greater hydrological connectivity to lakes and nutrient availability in the absence of permafrost. Conversely, an 8‐fold increase in CH4 emissions in warmer regions was associated with water temperature and shifts in microbial communities and dominant anaerobic processes. Our results suggest that the net radiative forcing from altered greenhouse gas emissions of northern peatland lakes this century will be dominated by increasing CH4 emissions and only partially offset by reduced CO2 emissions.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU)
dc.subjectBIOGEOSCIENCES
dc.subjectBiogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling
dc.subjectCarbon cycling
dc.subjectLimnology
dc.subjectPermafrost, cryosphere, and high‐latitude processes
dc.subjectTrace gases
dc.subjectBiogeochemical kinetics and reaction modeling
dc.subjectNatural hazards
dc.subjectCRYOSPHERE
dc.subjectPermafrost
dc.subjectCryobiology
dc.subjectBiogeochemistry
dc.subjectGLOBAL CHANGE
dc.subjectHYDROLOGY
dc.subjectOCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL
dc.subjectNATURAL HAZARDS
dc.subjectOther
dc.subjectOCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL
dc.subjectPALEOCEANOGRAPHY
dc.subjectPLANETARY SCIENCES: COMETS AND SMALL BODIES
dc.subjectComets: dust tails and trails
dc.subjectPLANETARY SCIENCES: SOLAR SYSTEM OBJECTS
dc.subjectAsteroids
dc.subjectComets
dc.subjectResearch Article
dc.subjectgreenhouse gas
dc.subjectaquatic
dc.subjectpermafrost
dc.subjectlakes
dc.subjectclimate warming
dc.titleOpposing Effects of Climate and Permafrost Thaw on CH4 and CO2 Emissions From Northern Lakes
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-11-12T18:57:06Z
prism.issueIdentifier4
prism.publicationNameAGU ADVANCES
prism.volume2
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.78058
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-10-13
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1029/2021AV000515
rioxxterms.versionAO
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidTanentzap, Andrew [0000-0002-2883-1901]
dc.identifier.eissn2576-604X
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Research Council (804673)
cam.issuedOnline2021-11-11


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