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dc.contributor.authorMathews, Channing J
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Luke
dc.contributor.authorJoy, Angelina
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Fidelia
dc.contributor.authorWinterbottom, Mark
dc.contributor.authorRutland, Adam
dc.contributor.authorDrews, Marc
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Adam J
dc.contributor.authorMulvey, Kelly Lynn
dc.contributor.authorHartstone-Rose, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-24T20:23:38Z
dc.date.available2021-11-24T20:23:38Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.date.submitted2021-04-12
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.otherpone-d-21-12139
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/331042
dc.description.abstractThis study explored relations between COVID-19 news source, trust in COVID-19 information source, and COVID-19 health literacy in 194 STEM-oriented adolescents and young adults from the US and the UK. Analyses suggest that adolescents use both traditional news (e.g., TV or newspapers) and social media news to acquire information about COVID-19 and have average levels of COVID-19 health literacy. Hierarchical linear regression analyses suggest that the association between traditional news media and COVID-19 health literacy depends on participants' level of trust in their government leader. For youth in both the US and the UK who used traditional media for information about COVID-19 and who have higher trust in their respective government leader (i.e., former US President Donald Trump and UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson) had lower COVID-19 health literacy. Results highlight how youth are learning about the pandemic and the importance of not only considering their information source, but also their levels of trust in their government leaders.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.subjectResearch Article
dc.subjectMedicine and health sciences
dc.subjectPeople and places
dc.subjectSocial sciences
dc.subjectComputer and information sciences
dc.subjectScience policy
dc.titleAssessing adolescents' critical health literacy: How is trust in government leadership associated with knowledge of COVID-19?
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-11-24T20:23:38Z
prism.issueIdentifier11
prism.publicationNamePLoS One
prism.volume16
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.78486
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-10-20
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pone.0259523
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
datacite.contributor.supervisoreditor: Camacho-Rivera, Marlene
dc.contributor.orcidMathews, Channing J [0000-0002-4716-2299]
dc.contributor.orcidWinterbottom, Mark [0000-0001-8748-6733]
dc.contributor.orcidHoffman, Adam J [0000-0001-5508-3905]
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
pubs.funder-project-idU.S. National Science Foundation (DRL-1831593)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (206259/Z/17/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idEconomic and Social Research Council (206259/Z/17/Z)
cam.issuedOnline2021-11-24


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