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dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Stuart J
dc.contributor.authorClutton-Brock, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorPfeiffer, Dirk U
dc.contributor.authorDrewe, Julian A
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-21T02:02:55Z
dc.date.available2022-02-21T02:02:55Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-13
dc.identifier.issn2076-2615
dc.identifier.otherPMC8772857
dc.identifier.other35049814
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/334261
dc.description.abstractIndividuals vary in their potential to acquire and transmit infections, but this fact is currently underexploited in disease control strategies. We trialled a trait-based vaccination strategy to reduce tuberculosis in free-living meerkats by targeting high-contact meerkats (socially dominant individuals) in one study arm, and high-susceptibility individuals (young subordinates) in a second arm. We monitored infection within vaccinated groups over two years comparing the results with untreated control groups. Being a member of a high-contact group had a protective effect on individuals' survival times (Hazard Ratio = 0.5, 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.29-0.88, p = 0.02) compared to control groups. Over the study, odds of testing positive for tuberculosis increased more than five-fold in control groups (Odds Ratio = 5.40, 95% CI = 0.94-30.98, p = 0.058); however, no increases were observed in either of the treatment arms. Targeted disease control approaches, such as the one described in this study, allow for reduced numbers of interventions. Here, trait-based vaccination was associated with reduced infection rates and thus has the potential to offer more efficient alternatives to traditional mass-vaccination policies. Such improvements in efficiency warrant further study and could make infectious disease control more practically achievable in both animal (particularly wildlife) and human populations.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcenlmid: 101635614
dc.sourceessn: 2076-2615
dc.subjectWildlife Disease
dc.subjectMeerkats
dc.subjectTargeted Disease Control
dc.subjectTrait-based Vaccination
dc.titleTrait-Based Vaccination of Individual Meerkats (Suricata suricatta) against Tuberculosis Provides Evidence to Support Targeted Disease Control.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-02-21T02:02:55Z
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationNameAnimals (Basel)
prism.volume12
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.81674
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-01-06
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3390/ani12020192
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidPatterson, Stuart J [0000-0002-4907-8373]
dc.contributor.orcidClutton-Brock, Timothy [0000-0001-8110-8969]
dc.contributor.orcidPfeiffer, Dirk U [0000-0001-7000-0530]
dc.contributor.orcidDrewe, Julian A [0000-0003-0709-8066]
dc.identifier.eissn2076-2615
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Research Council (294494)
cam.issuedOnline2022-01-13


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International