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dc.contributor.authorHolness, MB
dc.contributor.authorFowler, AC
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-12T16:00:37Z
dc.date.available2022-05-12T16:00:37Z
dc.date.issued2022-05
dc.date.submitted2021-08-04
dc.identifier.issn0010-7999
dc.identifier.others00410-022-01917-6
dc.identifier.other1917
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/337081
dc.description.abstractAbstract: The thermodynamic equilibrium dihedral angle at grain junctions in crystalline rocks is set by the grain boundary interfacial surface energies, but the long times required to attain equilibrium mean that the observed dihedral angles in igneous rocks are generally set by the kinetics of crystallisation. We distinguish three types of augite–plagioclase–plagioclase dihedral angle in mafic igneous rocks. In the first, augite grows in the pores of a pre-existing plagioclase framework accompanied by little to no inwards-growth of the plagioclase pore walls. In the second, the plagioclase pore walls grow inwards simultaneously with the augite, and the dihedral angle is generally larger than the original angle at which the two plagioclase grains impinged except when the impingement angle itself is large. The first type is seen in rapidly crystallised rocks, whereas the second is observed in slowly cooled rocks. The third type is highly asymmetric and resembles (and so we call) an eagle’s beak: it is only seen in slowly cooled rocks. It is common in gabbroic cumulates, and is also present in strongly orthocumulate troctolites. Using the mode of interstitial phases to calculate the amount of interstitial liquid present in a series of mafic cumulates from the Rum and Skaergaard layered intrusions, we show that the asymmetry of three-grain junctions in troctolites increases as the rocks progress from adcumulate to orthocumulate (i.e. as the olivine–plagioclase crystal mush becomes more liquid-rich), with eagles’ beaks becoming the dominant three-grain junction geometry for troctolitic mushes containing ∼ 12 vol.% interstitial material (corresponding to ∼ 30 vol.% liquid in the mush). The geometry of three-grain junctions in mafic rocks is thus a function not only of cooling rate, but also of the progression along the liquid line of descent during fractionation. The first two types of junction are formed in relatively primitive liquids, during which the crystal mushes on the margins of the solidifying magma body are formed predominantly of plagioclase and olivine, whereas the eagle’s beak geometry occurs once augite forms an important component of the crystal framework in the accumulating mush, either because it is a framework-forming primocryst phase or because it grows from highly abundant interstitial liquid.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
dc.subjectOriginal Paper
dc.subjectMagma crystallisation
dc.subjectDihedral angle
dc.subjectEagles’ beaks
dc.titleThe formation of three-grain junctions during solidification. Part I: observations
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-05-12T16:00:36Z
prism.issueIdentifier5
prism.publicationNameContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology
prism.volume177
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.84500
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-04-15
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s00410-022-01917-6
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidFowler, AC [0000-0002-2062-6372]
dc.identifier.eissn1432-0967
pubs.funder-project-idnatural environment research council (NE/N009894/1)
pubs.funder-project-idengineering and physical sciences research council (NE/N009894/1)
pubs.funder-project-idscience foundation ireland (12/IA/1683)


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