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dc.contributor.authorMunton, Jessie
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-24T08:00:29Z
dc.date.available2022-05-24T08:00:29Z
dc.date.issued2022-06
dc.identifier.issn0029-4624
dc.identifier.othernous12360
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/337420
dc.description.abstractAbstract: It is an apparent truism about visual perception that we can see only what is visible to us. It is also frequently accepted that visual perception is dynamic: our visual experiences are extended through, and can evolve over time. I argue that taking the dynamism of visual experience seriously renders certain simplistic interpretations of the first claim, that a subject at a given time can see only what is visible to her at that time, false: we can be meaningfully said to see invisible objects. This counterintuitive result in turn focuses our attention on the relationship between perception and memory. I show that it is difficult to draw a clear or simple distinction between the two. Memory and perception rely on, and blend with, one another. Together, these claims point us away from understanding visual perception as a simple reflection of the environment, and instead as closer to a process of dynamic modelling that draws together occurrent stimulation and stored information.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectARTICLE
dc.subjectARTICLES
dc.titleHow to see invisible objects
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-05-24T08:00:28Z
prism.endingPage365
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationNameNoûs
prism.startingPage343
prism.volume56
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.84833
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/nous.12360
rioxxterms.versionAO
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidMunton, Jessie [0000-0003-2351-8980]
dc.identifier.eissn1468-0068
cam.issuedOnline2021-01-15


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