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dc.contributor.authorKoch, Hauke
dc.contributor.authorWelcome, Vita
dc.contributor.authorKendal-Smith, Amy
dc.contributor.authorThursfield, Lucy
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Iain W
dc.contributor.authorLangat, Moses K
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Mark JF
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Philip C
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-07T08:16:11Z
dc.date.available2022-06-07T08:16:11Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-20
dc.identifier.citationPhilosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences, volume 377, issue 1853, page 20210162
dc.identifier.issn0962-8436
dc.identifier.other35491601
dc.identifier.otherPMC9058528
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/337823
dc.descriptionFunder: Peter Sowerby Foundation
dc.description.abstractAntimicrobial nectar secondary metabolites can support pollinator health by preventing or reducing parasite infections. To better understand the outcome of nectar metabolite-parasite interactions in pollinators, we determined whether the antiparasitic activity was altered through chemical modification by the host or resident microbiome during gut passage. We investigated this interaction with linden (Tilia spp.) and strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) nectar compounds. Unedone from A. unedo nectar inhibited the common bumblebee gut parasite Crithidia bombi in vitro and in Bombus terrestris gynes. A compound in Tilia nectar, 1-[4-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-1,3-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylate]-6-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-β-d-glucopyranose (tiliaside), showed no inhibition in vitro at naturally occurring concentrations but reduced C. bombi infections of B. terrestris workers. Independent of microbiome status, tiliaside was deglycosylated during gut passage, thereby increasing its antiparasitic activity in the hindgut, the site of C. bombi infections. Conversely, unedone was first glycosylated in the midgut without influence of the microbiome to unedone-8-O-β-d-glucoside, rendering it inactive against C. bombi, but subsequently deglycosylated by the microbiome in the hindgut, restoring its activity. We therefore show that conversion of nectar metabolites by either the host or the microbiome modulates antiparasitic activity of nectar metabolites. This article is part of the theme issue 'Natural processes influencing pollinator health: from chemistry to landscapes'.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcenlmid: 7503623
dc.sourceessn: 1471-2970
dc.subjectDisease
dc.subjectPhytochemistry
dc.subjectGut Microbiota
dc.subjectTrypanosomatidae
dc.subjectBee Health
dc.subjectHost–parasite Ecology
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectBees
dc.subjectParasites
dc.subjectAnti-Infective Agents
dc.subjectAntiparasitic Agents
dc.subjectHost-Parasite Interactions
dc.subjectPlant Nectar
dc.subjectGastrointestinal Microbiome
dc.titleHost and gut microbiome modulate the antiparasitic activity of nectar metabolites in a bumblebee pollinator.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-07T08:16:10Z
prism.publicationNamePhilos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.85232
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-02-06
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rstb.2021.0162
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidKoch, Hauke [0000-0002-2694-7775]
dc.contributor.orcidKendal-Smith, Amy [0000-0002-8191-0289]
dc.contributor.orcidThursfield, Lucy [0000-0002-0939-2296]
dc.contributor.orcidFarrell, Iain W [0000-0002-2257-8853]
dc.contributor.orcidLangat, Moses K [0000-0001-8079-7774]
dc.contributor.orcidBrown, Mark JF [0000-0002-8887-3628]
dc.contributor.orcidStevenson, Philip C [0000-0002-0736-3619]
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2970
cam.issuedOnline2022-05-02


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International