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dc.contributor.authorMendes Serrao, Eva
dc.contributor.authorJoslin, Emily
dc.contributor.authorMcMorran, Victoria
dc.contributor.authorHough, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Cheryl
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorCargill, Emma
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Ashley S
dc.contributor.authorO’Carrigan, Brent
dc.contributor.authorParkinson, Christine A
dc.contributor.authorCorrie, Pippa G
dc.contributor.authorSadler, Timothy J
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-14T16:00:59Z
dc.date.available2022-06-14T16:00:59Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-14
dc.date.submitted2022-04-20
dc.identifier.others40644-022-00463-5
dc.identifier.other463
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/338091
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Background: Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer, with a tendency to metastasise to any organ of the human body. While the most common body organs affected include liver, lungs, brain and soft tissues, spread to the gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon. In the bowel, it can present with a multitude of imaging appearances, more rarely as an aneurysmal dilatation. This appearance is classically associated with lymphoma, but it has more rarely been associated with other forms of malignancy. Case presentation: We report a case series of three patients with aneurysmal dilatation in the small bowel (SB) confirmed to be due to metastatic melanoma (MM). All patients had non-specific symptoms; most times being attributed initially to causes other than melanoma. On CT the identified aneurysmal SB dilatations were diagnosed as presumed lymphoma in all cases. In two cases, the aneurysmal dilatation was the first presentation of metastatic disease and in two of the cases more than one site of the gastrointestinal tract was concomitantly involved. All patients underwent surgical resection with histological confirmation of MM. Conclusions: Recognition of unusual SB presentation of MM, such as aneurysmal SB dilatation, is important to expedite diagnosis, provide appropriate treatment, and consequently improve quality of life and likely survival of these patients. As the most common cancer to metastasise to the SB and as a known imaging mimicker, MM should remain in any radiologist’s differential diagnosis for SB lesions with aneurysmal dilatation.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.subjectCase Series
dc.subjectMelanoma
dc.subjectMetastatic
dc.subjectAneurysmal
dc.subjectSmall bowel
dc.subjectRadiology
dc.titleThe forgotten appearance of metastatic melanoma in the small bowel
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-14T16:00:58Z
prism.issueIdentifier1
prism.publicationNameCancer Imaging
prism.volume22
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.85500
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-05-19
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s40644-022-00463-5
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidMendes Serrao, Eva [0000-0002-1402-3444]
dc.identifier.eissn1470-7330
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute for Health Research (CL-2017-14-502)


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