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dc.contributor.authorPadilla-Iglesias, Cecilia
dc.contributor.authorAtmore, Lane M
dc.contributor.authorOlivero, Jesús
dc.contributor.authorLupo, Karen
dc.contributor.authorManica, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorArango Isaza, Epifanía
dc.contributor.authorVinicius, Lucio
dc.contributor.authorMigliano, Andrea Bamberg
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-19T01:02:50Z
dc.date.available2022-06-19T01:02:50Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-24
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.other35580185
dc.identifier.otherPMC9173804
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/338231
dc.description.abstractThe evolutionary history of African hunter-gatherers holds key insights into modern human diversity. Here, we combine ethnographic and genetic data on Central African hunter-gatherers (CAHG) to show that their current distribution and density are explained by ecology rather than by a displacement to marginal habitats due to recent farming expansions, as commonly assumed. We also estimate the range of hunter-gatherer presence across Central Africa over the past 120,000 years using paleoclimatic reconstructions, which were statistically validated by our newly compiled dataset of dated archaeological sites. Finally, we show that genomic estimates of divergence times between CAHG groups match our ecological estimates of periods favoring population splits, and that recoveries of connectivity would have facilitated subsequent gene flow. Our results reveal that CAHG stem from a deep history of partially connected populations. This form of sociality allowed the coexistence of relatively large effective population sizes and local differentiation, with important implications for the evolution of genetic and cultural diversity in Homo sapiens.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceessn: 1091-6490
dc.sourcenlmid: 7505876
dc.subjectPopulation dynamics
dc.subjectHunter-gatherers
dc.subjectenvironmental change
dc.subjectCentral Africa
dc.subjectEcological Niche Modelling
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectPopulation Density
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural
dc.subjectArchaeology
dc.subjectCultural Diversity
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectAfrica
dc.subjectGenetic Variation
dc.titlePopulation interconnectivity over the past 120,000 years explains distribution and diversity of Central African hunter-gatherers.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-19T01:02:47Z
prism.issueIdentifier21
prism.publicationNameProc Natl Acad Sci U S A
prism.volume119
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.85643
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-04-05
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1073/pnas.2113936119
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidAtmore, Lane M [0000-0002-8903-8149]
dc.contributor.orcidOlivero, Jesús [0000-0003-1714-0360]
dc.contributor.orcidLupo, Karen [0000-0003-3652-3105]
dc.contributor.orcidManica, Andrea [0000-0003-1895-450X]
dc.contributor.orcidVinicius, Lucio [0000-0002-9396-3249]
dc.identifier.eissn1091-6490
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Commission Horizon 2020 (H2020) Marie Sk?odowska-Curie actions (813383)
cam.issuedOnline2022-05-17


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International