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dc.contributor.authorAdalbert, Robert
dc.contributor.authorCahalan, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Eleanor L
dc.contributor.authorAlmuhanna, Abdulaziz
dc.contributor.authorLoreto, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorPór, Erzsébet
dc.contributor.authorKörmöczy, Laura
dc.contributor.authorPerkins, Justin
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Michael P
dc.contributor.authorPiercy, Richard J
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-29T19:43:45Z
dc.date.available2022-06-29T19:43:45Z
dc.date.issued2022-11
dc.date.submitted2021-07-20
dc.identifier.issn0021-8782
dc.identifier.otherjoa13719
dc.identifier.otherjanat-2021-0296.r2
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/338460
dc.descriptionFunder: UK Horserace Betting Levy Board
dc.description.abstractNeurological disorders are prevalent in horses, but their study is challenging due to anatomic constraints and the large body size; very few host-specific in vitro models have been established to study these types of diseases, particularly from adult donor tissue. Here we report the generation of primary neuronal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cultures from adult horses: the mixed, dissociated cultures, containing neurons and glial cells, remained viable for at least 90 days. Similar to DRG neurons in vivo, cultured neurons varied in size, and they developed long neurites. The mitochondrial movement was detected in cultured cells and was significantly slower in glial cells compared to DRG-derived neurons. In addition, mitochondria were more elongated in glial cells than those in neurons. Our culture model will be a useful tool to study the contribution of axonal transport defects to specific neurodegenerative diseases in horses as well as comparative studies aimed at evaluating species-specific differences in axonal transport and survival.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectORIGINAL ARTICLE
dc.subjectORIGINAL ARTICLES
dc.subjectaxonal transport
dc.subjectDRG
dc.subjectequine
dc.subjectmitochondria
dc.subjectneurodegenerative diseases
dc.titleCultured dissociated primary dorsal root ganglion neurons from adult horses enable study of axonal transport.
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-29T19:43:44Z
prism.publicationNameJ Anat
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.85873
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-06-13
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/joa.13719
rioxxterms.versionAO
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidAdalbert, Robert [0000-0003-0782-1402]
dc.identifier.eissn1469-7580
cam.issuedOnline2022-06-21


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