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dc.contributor.authorHenriques, Juan Diego
dc.contributor.authorAzevedo, João
dc.contributor.authorDias, Rui
dc.contributor.authorEstrela, Marco
dc.contributor.authorAscenço, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorVladimirova, Doroteya
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-29T19:44:31Z
dc.date.available2022-06-29T19:44:31Z
dc.date.issued2022-06
dc.date.submitted2020-11-16
dc.identifier.issn2730-597X
dc.identifier.others43615-021-00069-2
dc.identifier.other69
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/338481
dc.description.abstract<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Industrial symbiosis (IS) is a business model that proposes symbiotic exchanges, allowing the flow of resources, wastes, and utilities between companies. In recent years, IS initiatives have been exponentially growing around the world. This can be attributed to the increasing awareness on the possibility of obtaining economic, environmental, and social benefits through the implementation of this model. Despite the exponential growth of IS initiatives, the companies are still facing problems in the achievement of reliable and permanent synergies. Over the years the literature has identified several factors in the IS emerging process. Incentives are among these factors, being defined as unlocking tools or mechanisms related to diverse dimensions such as economic, political, social, intermediaries, process, and technology. Authors believe that the large-scale implementation of IS incentives has not been properly addressed. In order to promote facilitated IS implementation and achieve a replicator effect, incentives should be fully addressed. In many case studies, it has been observed that the incentives for IS can be threatened by risks, compromising the implementation, and hindering the emerging process. This study developed a dedicated framework that is composed of incentive identification from best practices of IS and expert consultation; a risk assessment model based on risk factors identification and clustering; and finally, the mitigation actions based on the assessment outputs. The main result of this study is one set of mitigations actions that correlate the implementation levels (clusters) and the potential stakeholders involved.</jats:p>
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectOriginal Paper
dc.subjectCircular economy
dc.subjectIndustrial symbiosis
dc.subjectIncentives
dc.subjectAssessment framework
dc.subjectRisk mitigation
dc.titleImplementing Industrial Symbiosis Incentives: an Applied Assessment Framework for Risk Mitigation
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-29T19:44:31Z
prism.endingPage692
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationNameCircular Economy and Sustainability
prism.startingPage669
prism.volume2
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.85894
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-05-25
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s43615-021-00069-2
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.contributor.orcidHenriques, Juan Diego [0000-0002-0734-5429]
dc.contributor.orcidDias, Rui [0000-0003-4175-9593]
dc.contributor.orcidEstrela, Marco [0000-0001-7020-9588]
dc.contributor.orcidAscenço, Cristina [0000-0002-5822-896X]
dc.identifier.eissn2730-5988
cam.issuedOnline2021-06-03


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