Prevalence and gender disparity of those who screen positive for depression in China by the classification of the employer and industry: a cross-sectional, population-based study


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Authors
Chen, Shanquan 
Wang, Yuqi 
She, Rui 
Abstract

jats:titleAbstract</jats:title>jats:sec jats:titleBackground</jats:title> jats:pThe important role of mental health in sustainable economic development is gradually being recognized. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and gender disparity of those who screen positive for depression in China by the employer and industrial classification.</jats:p> </jats:sec>jats:sec jats:titleMethods</jats:title> jats:pWe used data from a nationally representative survey, the China Family Panel Studies. Depression was judged by the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Employer classifications were categorized according to the local characteristics of Mainland China. Industrial classifications were defined using level-1 of the China version of the International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities. Weighted logistic regressions were fitted to estimate the gender disparities, controlling for confounders.</jats:p> </jats:sec>jats:sec jats:titleResults</jats:title> jats:pForty eight thousand six hundred twenty eight adults were included. 18.7% (95%CI 18.1–19.4) of sampled adults were screened positive for depression symptoms, with 16.6% (95%CI 15.8–17.5) in males vs 21.0% (95%CI 20.1–22.0) in females. By classification of the employer, the prevalence was lowest among those employed by Government/party organisations (11.8%, 95%CI 8.9–15.4), and highest in those self-employed (21.8%, 95%CI 20.8–22.9); the gender disparity was mainly found in those employed by Sole proprietorship (Adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.95, 95%CI 1.19–3.19) and Private enterprise (AOR = 1.34, 95%CI 1.13–1.59), as well as those self-employed (AOR = 1.49, 95%CI 1.3–1.17). By industrial classification, the prevalence was lowest among those who worked in the industry of Real estate (7.2%, 95%CI 4.8–10.6), and highest among those who worked in the industry of Agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry and fishing (22.9%, 95%CI 15.5–32.4); the gender disparity was mainly found in those who worked in the industry of Agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry and fishing (AOR = 3.29, 95%CI 1.18–9.15), Manufacturing (AOR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.09–1.82), Wholesale and retail trade (AOR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.07–2.06), and Accommodation and food service (AOR = 1.91, 95% CI 1.15–3.18).</jats:p> </jats:sec>jats:sec jats:titleConclusion</jats:title> jats:pThe prevalence of depression in China had a wide variation by classifications of the employer and industry. Gender disparities were identified among workers from Sole proprietorship, Private enterprise, and self-employed, or workers from the industry of Agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry and fishing, Manufacturing, Wholesale and retail trade, and Accommodation and food service.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Description
Keywords
Research, Depression, Prevalence, Gender disparity, Industrial classification, Employer classification, China
Journal Title
BMC Psychiatry
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
1471-244X
Volume Title
Publisher
Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Sponsorship
Medical Research Council (MC_PC_17213)
NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre (BRC-1215-20014)