Imperialism, colonialism, and climate change science

Published version

Published version
Repository DOI

Change log
Authors
Mercer, Harriet 
Abstract

jats:titleAbstract</jats:title>jats:pHistorical studies of the influence of imperialism and colonialism on climate science have yet to be brought together into a critical synthesis. This advanced review offers a critical overview of the key themes of this literature with the primary intention of enabling historians and other scholars to recognize, specify, and acknowledge the roles of imperial and colonial processes in shaping scientific framings of climate. Following a brief overview of debates in older literature over the significance of imperialism and colonialism in climate sciences, the article investigates the wealth of recent scholarship that demonstrates specific and diverse connections between empires and climate science. Major features of this scholarship include: the role and the erasure of Indigenous and local knowledge; imperial climate infrastructures and visions; and climate data and theories in land empires as well as in informal empires and neocolonial settings. Through critically engaging these themes, the article seeks to help historians identify avenues for future research.</jats:p>jats:pThis article is categorized under:<jats:list list-type="simple"> jats:list-itemjats:pClimate, History, Society, Culture > World Historical Perspectives</jats:p></jats:list-item> jats:list-itemjats:pClimate, History, Society, Culture > Ideas and Knowledge</jats:p></jats:list-item> jats:list-itemjats:pThe Social Status of Climate Change Knowledge > Sociology/Anthropology of Climate Knowledge</jats:p></jats:list-item> </jats:list></jats:p>

Description
Keywords
empire, history, indigenous knowledge, local knowledge, scientific infrastructures
Journal Title
WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS-CLIMATE CHANGE
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
1757-7780
1757-7799
Volume Title
Publisher
Wiley
Sponsorship
Leverhulme Trust (RPG 2019‐251)