Remembering events and representing time


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Article
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Abstract

jats:titleAbstract</jats:title>jats:pEpisodic memory—memory for personally experienced past events—seems to afford a distinctive kind of cognitive contact with the past. This makes it natural to think that episodic memory is centrally involved in our understanding of what it jats:italicis</jats:italic> for something to be in the past, or to be located in time—that it is either necessary or sufficient for such understanding. If this were the case, it would suggest certain straightforward evidential connections between temporal cognition and episodic memory in nonhuman animals. In this paper, I argue that matters are more complicated than this. Episodic memory is memory for events and not for the times they occupy. As such, it is dissociable from temporal understanding. This is not to say that episodic memory and temporal cognition are unrelated, but that the relationship between them cannot be straightforwardly captured by claims about necessity and sufficiency. This should inform our theoretical predictions about the manifestations of episodic memory in nonhuman behaviour.</jats:p>

Description
Keywords
Episodic memory, Temporal cognition, Comparative psychology, Memory, Dependency thesis
Journal Title
Synthese
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
0039-7857
1573-0964
Volume Title
Publisher
Springer Science and Business Media LLC
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All rights reserved
Sponsorship
Trinity Hall, Cambridge