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Living standards of the small trader class in fifteenth-century Canterbury: evidence of escheators’ records

Accepted version
Peer-reviewed

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Article

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Authors

Briggs, Christopher 
Jervis, Ben 

Abstract

The escheator was an important royal official who, by the fifteenth century, had accumulated a wide range of responsibilities. Escheators were accountable to the exchequer, and each official was responsible for ‘escheats’ arising to the crown within a county or pair of counties, called an ‘escheatry’. One of the escheator’s roles was to account for goods and chattels forfeited to the crown by felons, fugitives and outlaws: people who had been convicted or indicted of felonies (including suicides); who had fled following an accusation of felony; or who had been outlawed following repeated failure to appear in court to answer a charge of felony, or to respond to a civil suit.

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Journal Title

Archaeologia Cantiana

Conference Name

Journal ISSN

0066-5894

Volume Title

Publisher

Kent Archaeological Society

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Sponsorship
Leverhulme Trust (RPG-2016-2019)
Leverhulme Trust
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