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  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: An iterative approach to prototyping digital twins
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-03-15) Lamb, Kirsten; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    Embarking on a digital twin journey can help you better understand a problem and provide insights that can help you solve a problem. This infographic is a guide to capturing value through prototyping digital twins, based on lessons learned from the digital twin research delivered by the Centre for Digital Built Britain in partnership with the Construction Innovation Hub and undertaken by the University of Cambridge. Please visit https://www.cdbb.cam.ac.uk/research/digital-twin-journeys for more information about this research programme.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    CReDo: Overview Report
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-03-30) Hayes, Sarah; Dent, Chris; Mawdsley, Ben; Judson, Rachel; Collingwood, Tom
    This report sets out an overview of the first phase of CReDo running from April 2021 to March 2022 with a focus on the technical architecture developed to integrate different datasets and models into the connected digital twin. CReDo is a climate adaptation digital twin sponsored by UK Research and Innovation and Connected Places Catapult and is the pilot project for the National Digital Twin programme. CReDo’s purpose is two-fold: To demonstrate the benefits of using connected digital twins to increase resilience and enable climate change adaptation and mitigation To demonstrate how principled information management enables digital twins and datasets to be connected in a scalable way as part of the development of the information management framework Data about assets is brought together across three infrastructure asset owners, — Anglian Water, BT and UK Power Networks — into a connected digital twin of the infrastructure system network. Combining data sets from three separate organisations into one system model is not straightforward. Principled information management techniques, such as using the appropriate ontologies and striving for semantic precision, are essential to bringing the data together to present the clearest picture of the infrastructure system without inaccuracies.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: Teaching a computer to see
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-03-18) Lamb, Kirsten; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Danish, Matthew; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    To asset owners and managers, understanding how people move through and use the built environment is a high priority, enabling better, more user-focused decisions. However, many of the methods for getting these insights can feel invasive to users. The latest output from Digital Twin Journeys looks at how a researcher at the University of Cambridge has solved this problem by teaching a computer to see. Working from the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, Matthew Danish is developing an innovative, low-cost sensor that tracks the movement of people through the built environment. DeepDish is based on open-source software and low-cost hardware, including a webcam and a Raspberry Pi. Using Machine Learning, Matthew has previously taught DeepDish to recognise pedestrians and track their journeys through the space, and then began training them to distinguish pedestrians from Cambridge’s many cyclists.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Gemini Papers: Summary
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-03-10) Gemini Council; Lamb, Kirsten
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Gemini Papers: Why connected digital twins
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-03-10) Gemini Council; Lamb, Kirsten; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Gemini Papers: How to enable an ecosystem of connected digital twins
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-03-10) Gemini Council; Lamb, Kirsten
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Gemini Papers: What are connected digital twins
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-03-10) Gemini Council; Lamb, Kirsten
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: Coffee time
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-01-24) Lamb, Kirsten; Sheppard, David; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    Sensor technology has come a long way over the last 30 years, from the world’s first, bulky webcam at the University of Cambridge Computer Science Department to near ubiquitous networks of sleek sensors that can provide data at an unprecedented volume, velocity and quality. Today, sensors can even talk to each other to combine single points of data into useful insights about complex events. The new webcomic ‘Coffee Time’ by Dave Sheppard, part of the Digital Twin Journeys series, tells the story of this evolution and what it means for what we can learn about our built environment through smart sensors.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Digital twin journeys: the journey to the smart hospital of the future
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2021-10-27) Lamb, K; Prince, K; Barrett, M; Lee, ELS; Pilosof, N; Fenby-Taylor, H; Walters, A; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    Digital twins can help organisations achieve various goals. In some cases, the end goal is for buildings and infrastructure to last longer, use less energy, and be safer. In others, it is enhancing the lives of people who interact with the built environment and its services. As highlighted by the Gemini Principles, these are not mutually exclusive aims, so wherever you are on your digital twin journey, it is important to consider other perspectives on the hybrid digital and physical systems you create. How will your digital twin fit into a wider ecosystem that provides services to all kinds of people? How will your asset’s performance impact the wider built environment and those who need to navigate it? Whose lives will be better if you share data securely and purposefully.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: Digital twins from space
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-03-21) Lamb, Kirsten; Selvakumaran, Sakthy; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    We all want the built environment to be safe and to last. However, minor movements over time from forces such as subsidence can impact these outcomes. It can also make connecting and modifying assets harder if they have drifted from the position in which they were built. If the assets are remote or hard to access, this makes tracking these small movements even more difficult. In the latest video from the Digital Twin Journeys series, the Construction Innovation Hub-funded Satellites research group tells the construction and built environment sectors what they need to know about remote sensing and using satellite data.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Building a cross-sector digital twin
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-02-28) Akroyd, Jethro
    The Climate Resilience Demonstrator, CReDo, is a climate change adaptation digital twin demonstrator project by the National Digital Twin programme to improve resilience across infrastructure networks. CReDo is a pioneering project to develop, for the first time in the UK, a digital twin across key services networks to provide a practical example of how connected-data and greater access to the right information can improve climate adaptation and resilience. CReDo looks specifically at the impact of extreme weather, in particular flooding, on energy, water and telecoms networks. It demonstrates how those who own and operate them can use secure, resilient, information sharing, across sector boundaries, to mitigate the effect of flooding on network performance and service delivery to customers. The CReDo digital twin uses an Information Management Framework approach to share data across sectors, integrating flood simulations for climate change scenarios with data from the utility networks. The digital twin models interdependence to illustrate the resilience of the networks as a combined system of systems.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Generating flood data
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-02-28) Salter, James; Ocio, David
    The Climate Resilience Demonstrator, CReDo, is a climate change adaptation digital twin demonstrator project by the National Digital Twin programme to improve resilience across infrastructure networks. CReDo is a pioneering project to develop, for the first time in the UK, a digital twin across key services networks to provide a practical example of how connected-data and greater access to the right information can improve climate adaptation and resilience. CReDo looks specifically at the impact of extreme weather, in particular flooding, on energy, water and telecoms networks. It demonstrates how those who own and operate them can use secure, resilient, information sharing, across sector boundaries, to mitigate the effect of flooding on network performance and service delivery to customers. The CReDo digital twin uses an Information Management Framework approach to share data across sectors, integrating flood simulations for climate change scenarios with data from the utility networks. The digital twin models interdependence to illustrate the resilience of the networks as a combined system of systems.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Modelling system impact
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-02-28) Schewe, Lars
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Assessing asset failure
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-02-28) Smith, James
    The Climate Resilience Demonstrator, CReDo, is a climate change adaptation digital twin demonstrator project by the National Digital Twin programme to improve resilience across infrastructure networks. CReDo is a pioneering project to develop, for the first time in the UK, a digital twin across key services networks to provide a practical example of how connected-data and greater access to the right information can improve climate adaptation and resilience. CReDo looks specifically at the impact of extreme weather, in particular flooding, on energy, water and telecoms networks. It demonstrates how those who own and operate them can use secure, resilient, information sharing, across sector boundaries, to mitigate the effect of flooding on network performance and service delivery to customers. The CReDo digital twin uses an Information Management Framework approach to share data across sectors, integrating flood simulations for climate change scenarios with data from the utility networks. The digital twin models interdependence to illustrate the resilience of the networks as a combined system of systems.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: Playing the digital twin ethics game
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-03-10) Lamb, Kirsten; Chalmers, Matthew; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    Motion sensors, CO2 sensors and the like are considered to be benign forms of monitoring, since they don’t capture images or personal data about us as we move through the buildings we visit. Or at least, that’s what we want to believe. Guest blogger Professor Matthew Chalmers (University of Glasgow) helped develop a mobile game called About Us as part of the CDBB funded Project Oak. The game takes players through a mission using information from building sensors to help them achieve their aims — with a twist at the end. He writes about why we all need to engage with the ethics of data collection in smart built environments.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: ecosystems of services enabled by connected digital twins
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-01-17) Lamb, Kirsten; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Lee, Edwin; Barrett, Michael; Prince, Karl; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    By 2050, an estimated 4.1 million people will be affected by sight loss in the UK, making up a portion of the 14.1 million disabled people in the UK. How might digital twins create opportunities for better accessibility and navigability of the built environment for blind and partially sighted people? A new infographic presents a conception of how this might work in the future.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: Data for asset managers
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2021-12-20) Lamb, Kirsten; Sheppard, David; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    'Now We Know' tells the story of a fictional building manager, Hank, who isn't sure how a building digital twin can help him in his work when the existing building management system tells him what he thinks he needs to know.
  • ItemOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: Creating value from high-volume built environment data
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2022-01-10) Lamb, Kirsten; Selvakumaran, Sakthy; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    Digital twins are not just a useful resource for understanding the here-and-now of built assets. If an asset changes condition or position over its lifecycle, historical data from remote sensors can make this change visible to asset managers through a digital twin. However, this means retaining and managing a potentially much larger data set in order to capture value across the whole life of an asset. In this blog post, Dr Sakthy Selvakumaran, an expert in remote sensing and monitoring, tells us about the importance of curation in the processing of high-volume built environment data.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: Sensors and sensibility
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2021-11-22) Lamb, Kirsten; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    When we travel by train, we expect that we will arrive at our destination safely and on time. Safety and performance of their service network is therefore a key priority for Network Rail. Our latest video in the Digital Twin Journeys series tells the story of how researchers have inherited two intensively instrumented bridges and are transforming that high volume and velocity of data into a digital twin showing the wear and pressures on the bridges, as well as other information that can help the asset owners predict when maintenance will be required and meet their key priorities.
  • ItemPublished versionOpen Access
    Digital Twin Journeys: Data ingestion
    (Centre for Digital Built Britain, 2021-11-19) Lamb, Kirsten; Xie, Xiang; Fenby-Taylor, Henry; Lamb, Kirsten [0000-0001-6504-3202]
    The research team for the West Cambridge Digital Twin project has developed a digital twin that allows various formats of building data to function interoperably, enabling better insights and optimisation for asset managers and better value per whole life Pound. The graphic centres the asset manager as a decision maker as a vital part of this process, and illustrates that each iteration improves the classification and refinement of the data. It also highlights challenges and areas for future development, showing that digital twin development is an ongoing journey, not finite destination.