Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWakeford, SallyAnnen
dc.contributor.authorHinvest, Nealen
dc.contributor.authorRing, Howarden
dc.contributor.authorBrosnan, Marken
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T14:30:27Z
dc.date.available2015-08-21T14:30:27Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-21en
dc.identifier.issn1525-5050
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/250349
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of autism spectrum disorders in epilepsy is approximately 15%-47%, with previous research by Wakeford and colleagues reporting higher autistic traits in adults with epilepsy. The aim of this study was to investigate autistic characteristics and their relationship to having seizures by employing two behaviour assessments in two samples: adults with epilepsy and controls. Method: The study employed the Social Responsiveness Scale shortened, SRS-S (epilepsy n=76, control n=19) and the brief Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised, RBS-R (epilepsy n=47, control n=21). This study employed a unique method to quantify the extent to which autistic characteristics are related to perceived mild seizure activity. Adults with epilepsy were instructed to rate their usual behaviour on each assessment, and at the same time rate again for their behaviour when they perceived they were having mild seizure activity. Results: Significantly higher SRS-S scores were related to having a diagnosis of epilepsy, and were perceived by adults with epilepsy to increase during mild seizure activity. These scores positively correlated with anti-epileptic drug control. No difference was found for RBS-R scores in adults with epilepsy compared to controls. Conclusion: Together, these results suggest that adults with epilepsy have higher autistic characteristics measured by the social responsiveness scale, while sameness behaviours remains unimpaired. The autistic characteristics measured by the social responsiveness scale were reported by adults with epilepsy to be more severe during their mild seizure activity.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to thank Epilepsy Action for the non-financial support of this research.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/*
dc.subjectEpilepsyen
dc.subjectAutismen
dc.subjectAutistic Characteristicsen
dc.subjectAutism Spectrum Disordersen
dc.subjectSocial Responsivenessen
dc.subjectRepetitive Behaviouren
dc.titleAutistic Characteristics in Adults with Epilepsy and Self-Perceived Seizure Activityen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Elsevier via http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.08.031en
prism.endingPage250
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameEpilepsy & Behavioren
prism.startingPage244
prism.volume52en
dc.rioxxterms.funderEpilepsy Action
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-08-19en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.08.031en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-08-21en
dc.identifier.eissn1525-5069
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2016-11-06


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales