Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorToleman, Michelleen
dc.contributor.authorReuter, Sandraen
dc.contributor.authorColl, Francescen
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Ewanen
dc.contributor.authorPeacock, Sharonen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-29T08:45:14Z
dc.date.available2016-04-29T08:45:14Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-01en
dc.identifier.issn1080-6040
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/255800
dc.description.abstractTo the Editor: Previously, we reported the use of whole-genome sequencing to investigate a putative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in 2011 in the special care baby unit (SCBU) at the Cambridge University Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust (CUH) in the United Kingdom (1). The report identified 26 related cases of infection with or asymptomatic carriage of MRSA and showed that transmission occurred within the SCBU, between mothers on a postnatal ward, and in the community; the outbreak apparently resolved at the end of 2011. The outbreak strain, sequence type (ST) 2371, was of a novel multilocus ST related to the dominant hospital-associated lineage in the UK (ST22, EMRSA-15), but unlike most ST22 strains, this strain was Panton-Valentine leucocidin–positive (2). Since then, ST2371 has been identified as a prevalent communityassociated MRSA clone in Southern India, and sporadic isolates have also been detected by whole-genome sequencing of MRSA in Denmark (3–5)
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was supported by grants from the UKCRC Translational Infection Research (TIR) Initiative, and the Medical Research Council (Grant Number G1000803) with contributions to the Grant from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, the National Institute for Health Research on behalf of the Department of Health, and the Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health Directorate (to Prof. Peacock); by a Healthcare Infection Society Major Research Grant; and by Wellcome Trust grant number 098051 awarded to the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
dc.rightsAttribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/*
dc.titleLocal Persistence of Novel MRSA Lineage after Hospital Ward Outbreak, Cambridge, UK, 2011–2013en
dc.typeArticle
dc.provenanceOA-8495
prism.endingPage1659
prism.number9en
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNameEmerging Infectious Diseasesen
prism.startingPage1658
prism.volume22en
dc.rioxxterms.funderMRC
dc.rioxxterms.funderBBSRC
dc.rioxxterms.funderNIHR
dc.rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trust
dc.rioxxterms.projectidG1000803
dc.rioxxterms.projectid098051
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-04-05en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3201/eid2209.151100en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-09-01en
dc.contributor.orcidHarrison, Ewan [0000-0003-2720-0507]
dc.contributor.orcidPeacock, Sharon [0000-0002-1718-2782]
dc.identifier.eissn1080-6059
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1000803)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:54:22 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales