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dc.contributor.authorHengist, Aen
dc.contributor.authorPerkin, Oen
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, JTen
dc.contributor.authorBetts, JAen
dc.contributor.authorHewison, Men
dc.contributor.authorManolopoulos, KNen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Kerryen
dc.contributor.authorKoulman, Alberten
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Den
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-28T00:30:21Z
dc.date.available2019-02-28T00:30:21Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-01en
dc.identifier.issn1471-9827
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/290046
dc.description.abstract© 2019 The Authors. Nutrition Bulletin published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Nutrition Foundation Vitamin D is lipophilic and accumulates substantially in adipose tissue. Even without supplementation, the amount of vitamin D in the adipose of a typical adult is equivalent to several months of the daily reference nutrient intake (RNI). Paradoxically, despite the large amounts of vitamin D located in adipose tissue, individuals with obesity are often vitamin D deficient according to consensus measures of vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations). Thus, it appears that vitamin D can become ‘trapped’ in adipose tissue, potentially due to insufficient lipolytic stimulation and/or due to tissue dysfunction/adaptation resulting from adipose expansion. Emerging evidence suggests that exercise may mobilise vitamin D from adipose (even in the absence of weight loss). If exercise helps to mobilise vitamin D from adipose tissue, then this could have important ramifications for practitioners and policymakers regarding the management of low circulating levels of vitamin D, as well as chronically low levels of physical activity, obesity and associated health conditions. This perspective led us to design a study to examine the impact of exercise on vitamin D status, vitamin D turnover and adipose tissue vitamin D content (the VitaDEx project). The VitaDEx project will determine whether increasing physical activity (via exercise) represents a potentially useful strategy to mobilise vitamin D from adipose tissue.
dc.description.sponsorshipBBSRC (BB/R018928/1)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleMobilising vitamin D from adipose tissue: The potential impact of exerciseen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage35
prism.issueIdentifier1en
prism.publicationDate2019en
prism.publicationNameNutrition Bulletinen
prism.startingPage25
prism.volume44en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.37271
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-01-07en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/nbu.12369en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-03-01en
dc.contributor.orcidJones, Kerry [0000-0002-7380-9797]
dc.contributor.orcidKoulman, Albert [0000-0001-9998-051X]
dc.identifier.eissn1467-3010
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) (146281)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International