Targeted temperature management in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or acute ischaemic stroke: updated consensus guideline recommendations by the Neuroprotective Therapy Consensus Review (NTCR) group.


Type
Article
Change log
Authors
Lavinio, Andrea 
Andrzejowski, John 
Antonopoulou, Ileana 
Geoghegan, Pierce 
Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of consistent, evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with fever after brain injury. The aim was to update previously published consensus recommendations on targeted temperature management after intracerebral haemorrhage, aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and acute ischaemic stroke in patients who require admission to critical care. METHODS: A modified Delphi consensus, the Neuroprotective Therapy Consensus Review (NTCR), included 19 international neuro-intensive care experts with a subspecialty interest in the acute management of intracerebral haemorrhage, aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and acute ischaemic stroke. An online, anonymised survey was completed ahead of the meeting before the group came together to consolidate consensus and finalise recommendations on targeted temperature management. A threshold of ≥80% for consensus was set for all statements. RESULTS: Recommendations were formulated based on existing evidence, literature review, and consensus. After intracerebral haemorrhage, aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and acute ischaemic stroke in patients who require critical care admission, core temperature should ideally be monitored continuously and maintained between 36.0°C and 37.5°C using automated feedback-controlled devices, where possible. Targeted temperature management should be commenced within 1 h of first fever identification with appropriate diagnosis and treatment of infection, maintained for as long as the brain remains at risk of secondary injury, and rewarming should be controlled. Shivering should be monitored and managed to limit risk of secondary injury. Following a single protocol for targeted temperature management across intracerebral haemorrhage, aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and acute ischaemic stroke is desirable. CONCLUSIONS: Based on a modified Delphi expert consensus process, these guidelines aim to improve the quality of targeted temperature management for patients after intracerebral haemorrhage, aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and acute ischaemic stroke in critical care, highlighting the need for further research to improve clinical guidelines in this setting.

Description
Keywords
guidelines, intensive care, intracerebral haemorrhage, neurocritical care, normothermia, stroke, subarachnoid haemorhhage, targeted temperature management, Humans, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Stroke, Brain Ischemia, Cerebral Hemorrhage, Ischemic Stroke, Hypothermia, Induced
Journal Title
Br J Anaesth
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
0007-0912
1471-6771
Volume Title
Publisher
Elsevier BV
Sponsorship
NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre (BRC-1215-20014)