Increasing incidence of group B streptococcus neonatal infections in the Netherlands is associated with clonal expansion of CC17 and CC23


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Authors
Bijlsma, Merijn W. 
de Goffau, Marcus C.  ORCID logo  https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7032-1852
van de Beek, Diederik  ORCID logo  https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4571-044X
Kuijpers, Taco W. 
Abstract

Abstract: Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal invasive disease worldwide. In the Netherlands incidence of the disease increased despite implementation of preventive guidelines. We describe a genomic analysis of 1345 GBS isolates from neonatal (age 0–89 days) invasive infections in the Netherlands reported between 1987 and 2016. Most isolates clustered into one of five major lineages: CC17 (39%), CC19 (25%), CC23 (18%), CC10 (9%) and CC1 (7%). There was a significant rise in the number of infections due to isolates from CC17 and CC23. Phylogenetic clustering analysis revealed that this was caused by expansion of specific sub-lineages, designated CC17-A1, CC17-A2 and CC23-A1. Dating of phylogenetic trees estimated that these clones diverged in the 1960s/1970s, representing historical rather than recently emerged clones. For CC17-A1 the expansion correlated with acquisition of a new phage, carrying gene encoding a putative cell-surface protein. Representatives of CC17-A1, CC17-A2 and CC23-A1 clones were identified in datasets from other countries demonstrating their global distribution.

Description
Keywords
Article, /631/326/325/1506, /631/326/421, /45/23, article
Journal Title
Scientific Reports
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
2045-2322
Volume Title
10
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group UK
Sponsorship
Wellcome Trust (Wellcome) (098051, 098051, 098051)
ZonMw (Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development) (016.116.358)