The Image of Justinianic Orthopraxy in Eastern Monastic Literature

Accepted version
Repository DOI

Type
Article
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Authors
Neary, Daniel 
Abstract

The monastic legislation contained in the Novels of the emperor Justinian reveals a marked imperial preoccupation with the regulation of matters pertaining to the ascetic life. As a program, however, it is commonly viewed as little more than empty rhetoric, the formal response of a beleaguered governing class to a phenomenon largely beyond its control. This article offers a different view. Through analysis of the hagiographies of three prominent holy men of the mid-sixth century (Sabas, Z‘ura, and Abraham of Farshut), it argues the influence of Justinian’s laws may be seen in the literature produced by Eastern monastic communities. These texts evidence the reception of an imperially-sanctioned model of ascetic “orthopraxy,” provoking a range of responses from monks forced to contend with its provisions.

Description

This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Johns Hopkins University Press via https://doi.org/10.1353/earl.2017.0004

Keywords
5004 Religious Studies, 4303 Historical Studies, 50 Philosophy and Religious Studies, 43 History, Heritage and Archaeology
Journal Title
Journal of Early Christian Studies
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
1067-6341
1086-3184
Volume Title
25
Publisher
Project MUSE
Sponsorship
AHRC