Consistency of maternal cognitions and principles across the first five months following preterm and term deliveries.


Type
Article
Change log
Authors
Winstanley, A 
Sperotto, RG 
Putnick, DL 
Cherian, S 
Bornstein, MH 
Abstract

The aims of this study were to examine and compare the development of parenting cognitions and principles in mothers following preterm and term deliveries. Parenting cognitions about child development, including thinking that is restricted to single causes and single outcomes (categorical thinking) and thinking that takes into account multiple perspectives (perspectivist thinking), have been shown to relate to child outcomes. Parenting principles about using routines (structure) or infant cues (attunement) to guide daily caregiving have been shown to relate to caregiving practices. We investigated the continuity and stability of parenting cognitions and principles in the days following birth to 5 months postpartum for mothers of infants born term and preterm. All parenting cognitions were stable across time. Categorical thinking increased at a group level across time in mothers of preterm, but not term, infants. Perspectivist thinking increased at a group level for first-time mothers (regardless of birth status) and tended to be lower in mothers of preterm infants. Structure at birth did not predict later structure (and so was unstable) in mothers of preterm, but not term, infants and neither group changed in mean level across time. Attunement was consistent across time in both groups of mothers. These results indicate that prematurity has multiple, diverse effects on parenting beliefs, which may in turn influence maternal behavior and child outcomes.

Description
Keywords
Caregiving, Cognitions, Infancy, Parenting, Prematurity, Principles, Adult, Caregivers, Child Development, Cognition, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant Behavior, Infant Care, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Maternal Behavior, Mothers, Pregnancy
Journal Title
Infant Behav Dev
Conference Name
Journal ISSN
0163-6383
1934-8800
Volume Title
37
Publisher
Elsevier BV
Sponsorship
Alice Winstanley was supported by a National Institutes of Health–Wellcome Trust four-year PhD studentship (084911/Z/08/Z), and Rebecca Sperotto was supported by a PhD studentship from the Waterloo Foundation and School of Psychology, Cardiff University. Diane L. Putnick and Marc H. Bornstein were supported by the intramural program of the NIH, NICHD.